I Think, Therefore I Move

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Wonderful new developments in biotechnologies are helping people with spinal cord injuries move simply by thinking! People who suffer traumatic spinal cord injuries go from one day being a healthy and functioning human being to being instantly and permanently paralyzed. Ian Burkhart, for example, was left with quadriplegia nearly six years ago after a diving […]

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This Week in Bioethics

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1. Canada’s Assisted Suicide Law Excludes Americans The physician assisted suicide bill introduced by Canadian parliament this week will prevent Americans from accessing it—a move to prevent suicide tourism. A well-intentioned effort perhaps, but the very legalization of suicide is bad for public health outcomes, regardless of location. Suicide is a tragedy whenever and wherever it […]

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Surrogacy Show and Tell

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Redbook magazine has a new online gallery of photos that “capture the beauty surrogacy.” The surrogate pregnancy adventure was chronicle by a birth photographer with the intended parent boasting that “Surrogacy can be just as special and beautiful as a natural pregnancy and birth.” As we often remark at the CBC, we live in a story […]

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This Week in Bioethics

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1. Physician Assisted Suicide Pills Made Cheaper Who doesn’t love a sale?! A new cocktail of drugs has been devised to make physician assisted suicide even cheaper in Washington State. Whereas the previous prescription would cost somewhere between $2,000-$5,000, the new mix is now priced at $500—a real steal! It’s no wonder why governments around […]

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Rethinking Euthanasia?

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Dr. Theo de Boer, a professor of health care ethics at the Theological University in Kampen and associate professor of ethics at the Protestant Theological University in Groningen in the Netherlands, has just published an essay in which he distances himself from the very practice that he once helped shape the policy for implementation. In […]

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This Week in Bioethics

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1. Canadians Reject Assisted Suicide for Mentally Ill One would hope this wouldn’t even be considered news, but just common decency. But after the latest news of Canada wanting to extend the practice of physician assisted suicide to physician assistants as well, it’s hard to know where it will stop. I suppose it’s somewhat comforting […]

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The Great Unaddressed Human Rights Issue of Our Day

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Moments after speaking before a sea of families in Rome about the dangers of commercial surrogacy, an Italian reporter asked why I was being so vocal in a country where it is already illegal. Isn’t that like preaching to the choir, she wondered? While the notion of speaking to hundreds of thousands of people who […]

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Canada’s Demand for Death

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I spent this past weekend in Montreal, Canada, where despite the expected joie de vivre that Francophone cultures are prone to celebrate, the province of Quebec seems to be spending more time and energy focused on death rather than life. Last year the Supreme Court of Canada overturned the country’s ban on physician assisted suicide […]

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Adult Stem Cells Used to Create Human Heart

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Earlier this week scientists announced that they had successfully grown a human heart using stem cells. That in itself is a major development. But to the surprise of many these stem cells did not come from embryos, but rather skin cells, making this not only a major development, but an ethical one too. The ability […]

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This Week in Bioethics

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1. The Council of Europe Rejects Surrogacy Earlier this week the Council of Europe rejected a report that called for the regulation of surrogacy, rather than an outright ban on the practice. Intrinsic to the practice of surrogacy is exploitation and coercion—and that’s why we’re grateful that the Council of Europe rejected allowing it in […]

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European Surrogacy Market Suffers Setback

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Yesterday, the Council of Europe rejected a report on surrogacy that proposed regulation of the practice rather than a full ban. This is excellent news for those of us who have been campaigning for so long to Stop Surrogacy Now in all forms and in all places. This comes at a time where Europe is […]

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Breaking: Europe Moves to Defend Women

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Bill O’Reilly212-396-9117 San Francisco–March 15…As the American media continues to obsess over New York businessman Donald Trump, to the exclusion of all else, Europe today moved to protect women from the fastest-growing form of exploitation in the 21st Century, the ravenous commercial surrogacy industry, the Center for Bioethics and Culture Network […]

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Every life matters. Everyone counts.

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Dear Friend, You probably know that my first career was in nursing. Much of my nursing experience was in pediatric critical care at major university hospitals where we saw the sickest of the sick and the rarest of the rare diseases. Rare diseases, especially in pediatrics, are even scarcer since many of these children never […]

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Exporting Sperm: American Freedom in Action

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The American ideal of freedom has long been the boast of many in our nation. It’s what causes some people to champion the slogan “Don’t tread on me.” It’s certainly what our founders fought to establish as the bedrock of our laws and governance. But a twisted conception of the ideal is also why the […]

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This Week in Bioethics

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1. Failed U.S. Uterus Transplant Two days after being hailed a success, the U.S.’s first uterus transplant has failed and the organ was removed after complications. Uterine transplants, while offering the hope of giving birth to women born without a uterus, are not without serious risks. Some critics have used this to champion surrogacy as […]

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Two Wrongs Don’t Make a Right

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Yesterday marked International Women’s Day—a time for the international community and ordinary citizens to “celebrate the social, economic, cultural, and political achievement of women.” A noble and worthwhile cause to be sure. But when news broke that a clinic in Cleveland successfully performed the nation’s first uterus transplant, some used the occasion to call for […]

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Everybody Loves a Sale

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In our documentary film Breeders?, one of the fertility doctors commenting on the high likelihood of twins in surrogate pregnancies joked that everybody loves a sale—her way of downplaying the fact that many intended parents seeking one child via surrogacy end up with two (or more). Now, in the United Kingdom, a fertility clinic is […]

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This Week in Bioethics

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1. Physician Assisted Suicide Fails in Maryland The state senator behind Maryland’s efforts to legalize physician assisted suicide withdrew his bill yesterday admitting that he did not have enough support to move it forward. Maryland was a key state for advocates of doctor prescribed suicide and this withdrawal marks a big victory for vulnerable patients […]

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