Adult Stem Cells Used to Create Human Heart

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Earlier this week scientists announced that they had successfully grown a human heart using stem cells. That in itself is a major development. But to the surprise of many these stem cells did not come from embryos, but rather skin cells, making this not only a major development, but an ethical one too. The ability […]

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This Week in Bioethics

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1. The Council of Europe Rejects Surrogacy Earlier this week the Council of Europe rejected a report that called for the regulation of surrogacy, rather than an outright ban on the practice. Intrinsic to the practice of surrogacy is exploitation and coercion—and that’s why we’re grateful that the Council of Europe rejected allowing it in […]

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European Surrogacy Market Suffers Setback

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Yesterday, the Council of Europe rejected a report on surrogacy that proposed regulation of the practice rather than a full ban. This is excellent news for those of us who have been campaigning for so long to Stop Surrogacy Now in all forms and in all places. This comes at a time where Europe is […]

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Breaking: Europe Moves to Defend Women

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Bill O’Reilly212-396-9117 San Francisco–March 15…As the American media continues to obsess over New York businessman Donald Trump, to the exclusion of all else, Europe today moved to protect women from the fastest-growing form of exploitation in the 21st Century, the ravenous commercial surrogacy industry, the Center for Bioethics and Culture Network […]

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Every life matters. Everyone counts.

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Dear Friend, You probably know that my first career was in nursing. Much of my nursing experience was in pediatric critical care at major university hospitals where we saw the sickest of the sick and the rarest of the rare diseases. Rare diseases, especially in pediatrics, are even scarcer since many of these children never […]

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Exporting Sperm: American Freedom in Action

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The American ideal of freedom has long been the boast of many in our nation. It’s what causes some people to champion the slogan “Don’t tread on me.” It’s certainly what our founders fought to establish as the bedrock of our laws and governance. But a twisted conception of the ideal is also why the […]

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This Week in Bioethics

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1. Failed U.S. Uterus Transplant Two days after being hailed a success, the U.S.’s first uterus transplant has failed and the organ was removed after complications. Uterine transplants, while offering the hope of giving birth to women born without a uterus, are not without serious risks. Some critics have used this to champion surrogacy as […]

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Two Wrongs Don’t Make a Right

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Yesterday marked International Women’s Day—a time for the international community and ordinary citizens to “celebrate the social, economic, cultural, and political achievement of women.” A noble and worthwhile cause to be sure. But when news broke that a clinic in Cleveland successfully performed the nation’s first uterus transplant, some used the occasion to call for […]

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Everybody Loves a Sale

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In our documentary film Breeders?, one of the fertility doctors commenting on the high likelihood of twins in surrogate pregnancies joked that everybody loves a sale—her way of downplaying the fact that many intended parents seeking one child via surrogacy end up with two (or more). Now, in the United Kingdom, a fertility clinic is […]

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This Week in Bioethics

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1. Physician Assisted Suicide Fails in Maryland The state senator behind Maryland’s efforts to legalize physician assisted suicide withdrew his bill yesterday admitting that he did not have enough support to move it forward. Maryland was a key state for advocates of doctor prescribed suicide and this withdrawal marks a big victory for vulnerable patients […]

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Human Gene Editing and Eugenics

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A recent essay by Brendan Foht in the Washington Post reveals the backwards logic of scientists who advocate for human gene editing and those who also support the idea that embryos that have been genetically modified must be destroyed. The advent of CRISPR technology allows for the possibility of us forever altering the human genome […]

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Merch Madness

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British Woman Seeks to Use Dead Daughter’s Frozen Eggs

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A sixty-year-old British woman is fighting a court battle to use her dead daughter’s frozen eggs and to act as a surrogate for them in order to conceive a child. The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA), the UK’s regulatory body for eggs and sperm, is fighting against her efforts, noting that the deceased did […]

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This Week in Bioethics

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1. World Medical Association to Revise Hippocratic Oath The World Medical Association, which represents over 100 national medical associations, has announced that a working group will be revising the oath its members take. While no announcements have been made, I’d be willing to bet that one of the first orders of business will be to […]

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Euthanasia and Euphemisms

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A recent article in a Dutch newspaper exclaimed: “Euthanasia Patient Saves Five Lives with Organ Donation.” After suffering a stroke, the man decided he no longer wanted to live and asked to be euthanized. The article went on to note, “He gave his last breath in an operating room at the Erasmus Medical Center in […]

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You are Cordially Invited

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The Board of Directors of The Center for Bioethics and Culture Network cordially invites you to   The Thirteenth Annual Paul Ramsey Award Dinner honoring Brent Waters, D.Phil.2016 Paul Ramsey Award Recipient   at Diablo Country ClubDiablo, CA on Saturday, April 16, 2016Reception at 5:30 pm / Dinner at 6:30 pm   RSVP by March […]

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Surrogacy: A One Sided Story

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This weekend an article in The Guardian profiled the rising number of British couples that utilize international surrogacy to have a child. The headline reads: “Childless UK couples forced abroad to find surrogates.” Did you catch that? Forced! The subtitle of the article notes, “Lack of clarity in UK laws causes anguish for prospective parents.” […]

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This Week in Bioethics

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1. IVF Conceived Children Face Poor Health Outcomes A new study in the journal of Human Reproduction warns that IVF conceived children may suffer poor health outcomes such as diabetes, high blood pressure, and obesity. According to Dr. Pascal Gagneux, an evolutionary biologist at the University of California San Diego, “We’re engaging in an evolutionary […]

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